Handbook of the Mammals of the World

A great series of books we have in the Reference Collection is the magnificent Handbook of the Mammals of the World from Lynx Edicions. ‘Handbook’ is a bit of a misnomer, as you’d need Hagrid’s hands to hold one comfortably; they’re closer to coffee table books in size, but the content is scientific in scope and presentation rather than general interest. The books are beautifully and profusely illustrated with wonderful color photographs, drawings, and range maps, and filled with scientific descriptions of each mammal. The articles are good starting points for further research on a given animal; there is also an extensive bibliography at the end of each volume. Six out of a projected nine volumes have been published since 2009:

Volume 1: Carnivores
Volume 2: Hoofed Mammals
Volume 3: Primates
Volume 4: Sea Mammals
Volume 5: Monotremes and Marsupials
Volume 6: Lagomorphs and Rodents I

We will soon have Volume 6, while the remaining volumes to be published are:

Volume 7: Rodents II
Volume 8: Insectivores
Volume 9: Bats

And did I mention the amazing photographs? Hunting, eating, resting, mating, raising young, and even spy hopping, where whales in a vertical posture raise their heads above the surface of the water so that they can see what’s going on – the photographs are stunningly good and a great complement to the articles. You can find the first five volumes in the Reference Collection at this call number:

REF QL701.2 .H36 2009

They’re well worth taking a few minutes to get acquainted with. Enjoy!

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North Entrance Open!

north-out

The Consortium Library’s north entrance recently opened, so you can now enter the Library from either side of the building.  Stop by and check out our new circulation desk, multi-media room, and IT computer lab on the first floor!  The indoor campus walkway now extends from Rasmuson Hall to the north side of the Library, shortening the outdoor walk between the Library and the Administration and Integrated Science Buildings.

desk

north-in

In October 2015, Consortium Library Dean Stephen Rollins wrote this about the upcoming project:

The North Entrance project is long overdue.  When the original 1973 library building was expanded in 2004, the new addition was designed to accommodate a second entrance on the north side of the building.  The plan was to add an arctic entryway once the demand justified its construction.  Based on frequent user comments and complaints and on user surveys, the demand for the north entrance has been steadily increasing over the years. The demand has increased as the campus expanded on the north side of the library building with the construction of the Conoco-Phillips Integrated Science Building, the parking garage, and the relocation of several humanities departments into the Administration Building.  The regular use of the Library for numerous public events every week has also increased the demand as more visitors come to campus and expect access to the building from the north side.  In fact the lack of a north entrance has been the number one complaint about the Library in recent years.

Using FY14 capital funding, the North Entrance project is more than just a second door for the building.  The project will greatly improve handicap access to the Library with parking spaces located just outside of the north entrance. The project also includes a second circulation service desk and a book security system.  With the second circulation desk, the multi-media collection will be moved near the north entrance improving service to this collection. By moving the multi-media collection, the student computer lab on the second floor will be moved to a preferred location on the first floor conveniently adjacent to the library’s reference desk.  Library users will benefit by having immediate access to both reference librarians and IT support.

It is expected that at least 5,000 visitors will use the north entrance weekly during the fall and spring semesters.  When the project is completed, there will be a second library circulation desk and better access to the building, the library collections, and the student computer lab.

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Data sources for information about your community

Where can you find reliable information about your local community and the United States? Discover this and more at the Population and Economic Data Workshop taking place at the library tomorrow, October 18, 2016 from 9 AM to 4 PM. The event features presenters from the Alaska Department of Labor, the United States Census Bureau, and the Alaska Division of Community and Regional Affairs. We will have a full day of workshop sessions, and you can attend just one or all of them. Spots are still available; view the schedule and sign up here: register to reserve seats.

Can’t attend? Try exploring the data and statistics sources listed on the Government Information research guide: http://libguides.consortiumlibrary.org/government_information.

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The Nobel Prize goes to…

This is the time of year that the Nobel Prizes are handed out to individuals that have made important contributions within Medicine (or Physiology,) Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace and Economics. On Thursday, October 13th, the recipient for the Nobel Prize in Literature will be announced. The Nobel Prize originates from Alfred Nobel, a Swedish businessman, inventor, engineer and chemist, who in 1895 decided to leave the bulk of his fortune in trust to establish a set of prizes. The prize in Economics was established in 1968 by the Swedish Central Bank (Sveriges Riksbank) in memory of Alfred Nobel. To find out more about the Nobel Prize, please take a closer look at the Nobel website. You can find out about the history of the prize and learn about current and past recipients at Nobelprize.org.

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Zoological Record celebrates 150 years

Celebrate the 150th anniversary of Zoological Record, the world’s oldest continuing database of animal biology.  The online database contains records back to 1864.  The broad scope of coverage ranges from biodiversity and the environment to taxonomy and veterinary sciences, and, as the world’s leading taxonomic reference, it also acts as the world’s unofficial register of animal names.

Find Zoological Record under Z in the list of Databases, or select it from the list of all databases in the Web of Science.

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