Alaska’s Economic Forecast and the Permanent Fund- January 9 from noon -1pm

Alaska’s Economic Forecast & the Permanent Fund

· Hosted by Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER)
Economists Neil Fried, Scott Goldsmith, and Mouhcine Guettabi discuss where our economy is headed and the opportunities and risks on the horizon. Bring your questions.

Wednesday, January 9, 2019 at 12 PM – 1 PM
Consortium Library Room 307

Earthquake Damage in the Consortium Library

Library Update as of Sunday December 2

The Consortium Library will be closed today, Monday and Tuesday.

The goods news is that there were no reported injuries in the Library during the earthquake on Friday.

While there was no major structural damage to the building and its exterior, there was damage inside. Water from a broken pipe in the 4th floor mechanical area leaked into the collection areas in Archives and AMIPA on the third floor. Work is already underway to stabilize the damage and AMIPA currently has equipment and materials drying in Library 307. There were three locations where glycol leaked from the heating systems and on to the floor. The worst leak was near the food vending machines at the north entrance. In numerous locations the suspended ceiling has partially fallen and there is the danger of further collapse in these areas. A large ceiling light fell to the floor in Library 302a, objects flew around in the office spaces, and pictures and signs were damaged.

By far, the biggest impact is on the library’s collections where at least 100,000 volumes fell to the floor. Again the good news is that the shelving performed as it was designed with no buckling or toppling.

The next steps before opening the library are to stabilize or repair the ceiling areas and to start the huge job of reshelving more than 100,000 volumes. We are restricted to small groups reshelving materials given the repair work that is needed around the building in the ceilings.

Student Success Open Forum for Faculty, Cancelled

Student Success Open Forum for Faculty, Cancelled

Small Changes that Make a Big Difference, an open forum for faculty, is co-sponsored by Dr. Claudia Lampman, Vice Provost for Student Success, and the Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence. Participants will be familiarized with insights into student success based on recent student performance data, and will explore specific approaches to teaching and learning that may improve retention; build connections to faculty, classmates, and the institution; and increase the likelihood of course completion.

Attend in person or via audio conference. Please RSVP using the following link: http://uaa.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3HMzOJztEFoK9BH

Participate via audio conference:
Call 1-866-832-7806 and enter participant code 3550591

Wednesday, Dec. 5, LIB 307, 2:30–4p.m.
.

For questions please contact Shawnalee, Director, Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence, at sawhitney@alaska.edu or 907-786-4645.

The Legacy of Sadako Exhibit in Reading Room

The Legacy of Sadako
Unveiling of the Exhibit

The members of Japanese Educational Tour of Colony High School met Mr. Masahiro Sasaki on March 11th, 2017 where he shared his thoughts about peace in the world. Mr. Masahiro Sasaki is an elder brother of Miss Sadako Sasaki who is the model for “The Children’s Peace Monument” in the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima. After being exposed to the atomic bomb, Sadako Sasaki suffered from leukemia and died at age of 12. Since her death, Mr. Sasaki has spent his time as an advocate of the world peace movement. Mr. Sasaki donated paper cranes that were folded by Sadako-san to the National 9/11 Memorial & Museum, The Pearl Harbor Museum, and the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri. Mr. Sasaki continues to appeal for world peace.

The members of Japanese Educational Tour of Colony High School presented a dream catcher as an Alaskan native art craft, an autographed letter from U.S. Congressman Don Young, and the flag of the United States of America that flew on Capitol Hill in Washington DC on February 11, 2017. February 11th is “National Foundation Day” in Japan. In return, Mr. Sasaki presented the Japanese Educational tour group with connected paper cranes which were folded by Mr. Sasaki. Colony High School is the first school in the world to receive one of Mr. Sasaki’s connected paper cranes. The members of the Japanese Educational Tour of Colony High School decided to donate the connected paper cranes to the UAA/APU Consortium Library as part of a permanent display which will be seen by tens of thousands of library visitors each year. The exhibit includes not only the connected paper cranes by Mr. Sasaki but hundreds of other paper cranes (Orizuru) folded by people in support of world peace.

Library South Entrance and Main Circulation Desk will be closed as of May 14th until further notice.

Library South Entrance and Main Circulation Desk will be closed as of May 14th until further notice.

A portion of the 1973 heating system is being replaced this summer. The impact of this renovation project on the library will be significant.

• The South Entrance and the library entrance gate at the SSB building will be closed as of May 14th. The public entrances to SSB will remain open during the library renovation project.

• The North Entrance will be the only public entrance to the library until further notice. Library operations normally handled by the main circulation desk will be available at the North Entrance desk.

• The Alaskana Collection on the second floor will be unavailable after May 14th since it will be under protective sheeting and inside the construction area.

• Wolfcards will not be issued in the library during the construction project while the main circulation desk is closed.

• Because of limited work space, the library is not accepting book donations during the construction project.

• On May 7th, most of the library’s north parking lot will be fenced off for the contractors and construction crews. The path between the north parking lot and the central SSB parking lot will be unavailable during most of the summer.

Because of the renovation project, the Justice Center and Academic Innovations and eLearning will be relocated during the week of May 7th to University Center. The Alumni Office is temporarily moving to the ADMIN building.

Why Take the LibQUAL Survey? Because We Listen!- After Hours Study Now until Midnight

Why Take the LibQUAL Survey? Because We Listen!

It is clear from the comments from the last LibQUAL survey that the library’s schedule was not addressing the needs of the university students in providing more evening hours. In responding to this concern, the library’s after hours study facility will close at midnight instead of 11pm, Sunday – Thursday starting in the spring semester. The Access Services Department is to be commended for providing the staff to cover the additional hours.

Prior to the budget cuts in FY15, the library was open with its afterhours study facility until 1am, Sunday –Thursday and until 10pm on Friday and Saturday for a total of 111.5 hours. The new schedule, closing at midnight, Sunday – Thursday and at 8:00pm on Friday and Saturday during the Spring 2018 semester, totals 102.5 hours or about 8% less hours per week than in FY15.

The library will continue to monitor the use of the building to determine if the library schedule is meeting the needs of most of the university students for an afterhours study facility.

Meeting Library Needs during Budget Cuts

With the start of this academic year, the Library is facing significant budget reductions. The total budget reduction for FY15 and FY16 is $1,050,853 or about 16% reduction in general funds since FY14.

While there were no layoffs at the Consortium Library, regular positions were eliminated. Three tenure track faculty positions, a web librarian, a reference librarian, and a medical librarian, and one staff position, were vacated because of three retirements and a resignation. One librarian and one staff member volunteered to reduce their schedule to 75% and another librarian took 20 LWOP days over the summer months. The dean’s 7-day furlough also adds to the Library’s reduction in personnel expenditures. In addition to the personnel expenditures, the Library’s acquisitions budget has been reduced by $300,000. To date 25 research databases and other electronic resources and hundreds of print and electronic journals have been identified for cancellation. We will also spend less for new books, travel, and professional development.

While the budget situation is certainly very challenging, it has not stopped the Library from responding to the needs of the university communities by moving ahead in certain areas. In response to student demand, five new group study rooms are being constructed on the second floor and should be available by October. Planning also continues for the new North Entrance. This project includes creating six handicap parking spots, a card swipe reader for the after hours study facility, a camera and book security system, a circulation desk, landscaping and an arctic entryway with an outside canopy. If everything goes as expected, the Library’s second entrance will open in June 2016.

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‘How can adults in our community get the tech skills they need?’ Oct. 1

Think Tank Series: ‘How can adults in our community get the tech skills they need?’ Oct. 1

Thursday, Oct. 1, 11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.
UAA/APU Consortium Library, Room 307

Guest agency: Anchorage Public Library
Topic: How can adults in our community get the tech skills they need?

Think Tanks are a monthly community engagement experience in which a nonprofit agency presents a challenge or issue and attendees brainstorm solutions for the organization.

The Anchorage Public Library provides many resources and adult services. One major focus is on digital literacy for adults in our community. How can we close the gap and help adults who aren’t so tech savvy catch up as virtually every critical service has moved online? How can we help adults gain technology skills that will help them get or keep a job? How can we educate adults so they don’t fall prey to online scams? How can we help community members wade through internet resources to get reliable information as opposed to unreliable or misinformation?

Students, faculty, staff and community members–join us to assist the Anchorage Public Library and contribute your thoughts and ideas to the discussion!

Pizza will be provided by Moose’s Tooth.

Parking Note: Free parking for this event is available in the Library Lot and the East (CPISB) Garage. Please allow extra time to find parking.

Creative Commons License

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Winter Bear Project Sept 14, 18-19

The Southcentral Foundation and Alaska Humanities Forum are cosponsoring a week of events related to Anne Hanley’s play, “The Winter Bear.” This show, about a troubled village kid set straight by an elder, also debuted at Cyrano’s and has since toured widely. “The Winter Bear Project” includes a discussion with the playwright and poet Stephen Bolen at 7:30 p.m. on Sept. 14 in room 307 of UAA/APU Consortium Library, a screening of a documentary about the play at 5:30 p.m. at the Alaska Native Heritage Center and two productions of the play at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 18-19 at Alaska Pacific University’s Grant Hall.

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