Registration now open for FranklinCovey: Speed of Trust training on Feb. 27. Registration ends Feb. 21

Registration now open for FranklinCovey: Speed of Trust training on Feb. 27

FranklinCovey: Speed of Trust
Wednesday, Feb. 27, 1–5 p.m.
UAA/APU Consortium Library, Room 307

Trust is a tool that can be used to increase productivity and decrease costs in the workplace by focusing on building and maintaining relationships with high trust. Facilitated by University of Alaska Chief Human Resources Officer (CHRO) Keli Hite McGee, the Speed of Trust explores the “4 Cores of Credibility,” the behaviors associated with high trust, and how to develop, restore, and extend trust within your organization.

Training information

Course cost is $80 via JV (includes a Franklin Covey AllAccess Pass).
Registration ends Thursday, Feb. 21, at 5 p.m.
Open to all UA employees – you may attend individually or as part of a team.
Participant capacity is limited to 30 people – an online training session is in progress.
To sign up for the session and receive credit for the training, log in to the myUA Employee Services Dashboard (https://www.alaska.edu/myua/), go to “My community>Learning Library,” and search for the training. Please be sure to check with your supervisor for approval to sign up for the training.

If you have any questions, please contact Statewide Human Resources at ua-swhr@alaska.edu or (907) 450-8200.

Creative Commons License

African American Oral Histories Available

Thanks to the Rasmuson Foundation, UAA and APU have access for the next year to the HistoryMakers website and to their collection of oral histories of African Americans. The grant program will also increase the number of oral histories for African Americans living in Alaska. There are currently 275 Alaska stories on the website.

Check out the website at: https://alaska.thehistorymakers.org/home

NWCCU Reaffirms UAA’s Institutional Accreditation. Message from Chancellor Sandeen

Dear UAA Community,
I am extremely pleased to inform you that the Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) has reaffirmed UAA’s institutional accreditation. My most heartfelt congratulations to everyone across all of our campuses on this signature accomplishment!

Many of you have been involved in this effort for months, even years, and I am appreciative of your excellent work. I have never before served at an institution that has so fully engaged the institutional accreditation process, across all campuses and including faculty, staff, students and community members. This is your moment!

What is institutional accreditation, and why is it important?
Institutional accreditation is an exhaustive review of every facet of our university. This is a positive milestone that is a testament to the contributions and quality of our students, faculty and staff.

Institutional accreditation qualifies UAA to participate in federal financial aid, and it means that UAA degrees and certificates are recognized by other institutions for things such as the transfer of credits and entrance into graduate study. Visit the Self-Study website to learn more.

What does this mean?
Our reaffirmation establishes UAA has met rigorous standards of quality, effectiveness and sustainability while meeting its mission to serve the needs of the State of Alaska. NWCCU reviewed mission and expectations; resources and capacity; planning and implementation; effectiveness and improvement; and mission fulfillment, adaptation and sustainability.

Through the analysis of accomplishments across our core themes of Teaching and Learning; Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity; Student Success; UAA Community; and Public Square, you demonstrated who we are as an institution.

“A common theme throughout the Seven Year Site Visit was a comprehensive commitment to the institution’s mission, particularly in relationship to access, student success, and supporting communities.”
– NWCCU Evaluation Team

Commendations
You will be proud that UAA received four commendations, each of which acknowledges a key area of accomplishment and reflects UAA’s values. UAA was commended for:

An inclusive planning process for UAA 2020, which brought the campuses together in an unprecedented joint effort focused on Student Success.
Its culture of diversity and inclusivity, especially in relationship to Alaska Native communities.
Its commitment to community engagement and the Public Square.
Its extensive assessment efforts related to student learning. Faculty exhibit robust ownership and leadership in assessing academic programs, and also engage proactively in the multifaceted assessment of general education.
Continuous improvement
NWCCU also noted two areas where UAA is in substantial compliance, but in need of improvement. These are institutional planning of graduate programs and a continued focus on collaborative Student Success efforts. These recommendations did not come as a surprise, as they are high priority areas that the institution is already working on and will continue to address.

I am honored and pleased the commission recognized the amazing work of our faculty, staff and students, who were integral to the entire process. I am committed to working with you to use the results of this process to move the university forward to serve Alaska and its diverse communities.

Congratulations UAA!

Chancellor Sandeen

Earthquake Damage in the Consortium Library

Library Update as of Sunday December 2

The Consortium Library will be closed today, Monday and Tuesday.

The goods news is that there were no reported injuries in the Library during the earthquake on Friday.

While there was no major structural damage to the building and its exterior, there was damage inside. Water from a broken pipe in the 4th floor mechanical area leaked into the collection areas in Archives and AMIPA on the third floor. Work is already underway to stabilize the damage and AMIPA currently has equipment and materials drying in Library 307. There were three locations where glycol leaked from the heating systems and on to the floor. The worst leak was near the food vending machines at the north entrance. In numerous locations the suspended ceiling has partially fallen and there is the danger of further collapse in these areas. A large ceiling light fell to the floor in Library 302a, objects flew around in the office spaces, and pictures and signs were damaged.

By far, the biggest impact is on the library’s collections where at least 100,000 volumes fell to the floor. Again the good news is that the shelving performed as it was designed with no buckling or toppling.

The next steps before opening the library are to stabilize or repair the ceiling areas and to start the huge job of reshelving more than 100,000 volumes. We are restricted to small groups reshelving materials given the repair work that is needed around the building in the ceilings.

Student Success Open Forum for Faculty, Cancelled

Student Success Open Forum for Faculty, Cancelled

Small Changes that Make a Big Difference, an open forum for faculty, is co-sponsored by Dr. Claudia Lampman, Vice Provost for Student Success, and the Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence. Participants will be familiarized with insights into student success based on recent student performance data, and will explore specific approaches to teaching and learning that may improve retention; build connections to faculty, classmates, and the institution; and increase the likelihood of course completion.

Attend in person or via audio conference. Please RSVP using the following link: http://uaa.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3HMzOJztEFoK9BH

Participate via audio conference:
Call 1-866-832-7806 and enter participant code 3550591

Wednesday, Dec. 5, LIB 307, 2:30–4p.m.
.

For questions please contact Shawnalee, Director, Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence, at sawhitney@alaska.edu or 907-786-4645.

The Legacy of Sadako Exhibit in Reading Room

The Legacy of Sadako
Unveiling of the Exhibit

The members of Japanese Educational Tour of Colony High School met Mr. Masahiro Sasaki on March 11th, 2017 where he shared his thoughts about peace in the world. Mr. Masahiro Sasaki is an elder brother of Miss Sadako Sasaki who is the model for “The Children’s Peace Monument” in the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima. After being exposed to the atomic bomb, Sadako Sasaki suffered from leukemia and died at age of 12. Since her death, Mr. Sasaki has spent his time as an advocate of the world peace movement. Mr. Sasaki donated paper cranes that were folded by Sadako-san to the National 9/11 Memorial & Museum, The Pearl Harbor Museum, and the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri. Mr. Sasaki continues to appeal for world peace.

The members of Japanese Educational Tour of Colony High School presented a dream catcher as an Alaskan native art craft, an autographed letter from U.S. Congressman Don Young, and the flag of the United States of America that flew on Capitol Hill in Washington DC on February 11, 2017. February 11th is “National Foundation Day” in Japan. In return, Mr. Sasaki presented the Japanese Educational tour group with connected paper cranes which were folded by Mr. Sasaki. Colony High School is the first school in the world to receive one of Mr. Sasaki’s connected paper cranes. The members of the Japanese Educational Tour of Colony High School decided to donate the connected paper cranes to the UAA/APU Consortium Library as part of a permanent display which will be seen by tens of thousands of library visitors each year. The exhibit includes not only the connected paper cranes by Mr. Sasaki but hundreds of other paper cranes (Orizuru) folded by people in support of world peace.

Library South Entrance and Main Circulation Desk will be closed as of May 14th until further notice.

Library South Entrance and Main Circulation Desk will be closed as of May 14th until further notice.

A portion of the 1973 heating system is being replaced this summer. The impact of this renovation project on the library will be significant.

• The South Entrance and the library entrance gate at the SSB building will be closed as of May 14th. The public entrances to SSB will remain open during the library renovation project.

• The North Entrance will be the only public entrance to the library until further notice. Library operations normally handled by the main circulation desk will be available at the North Entrance desk.

• The Alaskana Collection on the second floor will be unavailable after May 14th since it will be under protective sheeting and inside the construction area.

• Wolfcards will not be issued in the library during the construction project while the main circulation desk is closed.

• Because of limited work space, the library is not accepting book donations during the construction project.

• On May 7th, most of the library’s north parking lot will be fenced off for the contractors and construction crews. The path between the north parking lot and the central SSB parking lot will be unavailable during most of the summer.

Because of the renovation project, the Justice Center and Academic Innovations and eLearning will be relocated during the week of May 7th to University Center. The Alumni Office is temporarily moving to the ADMIN building.