Oct. 25: Cross-Cultural Communication from an Alaska Native Perspective-Library 214

Oct. 25: Cross-Cultural Communication from an Alaska Native Perspective

Cross-Cultural Communication from an Alaska Native Perspective
Oct. 25 | 2-3:30 p.m. | LIB 214 & via distance
Led by Dr. Panigkaq Agatha John-Shields

Dr. John-Shields will use stories to introduce ways of learning and being from an Alaska Native perspective. Participants will experience different communication approaches and reflect on ways to understand students, faculty, and staff of different cultures, including recognizing communication styles that may be misunderstood from a Western perspective. All levels of experience are welcome.

Museums: Power, Access, and Community October 22, 4pm – 6pm

Museums: Power, Access, and Community, 2

Tue, October 22, 4pm – 6pm

UAA/APU Consortium Library, room 307
Description
Aisha Barnes, UAA Writing Department Faculty and Hollis Mickey, Anchorage Museum Director of Learning and Engagement are hosting three presentations and discussions centered around the role and responsibilities of museums in communities, and our responses to works within museums.

This event, Providing Access to Objects: Collecting, Exhibiting, and Interpreting welcomes Anchorage Museum staff Francesca Du Brock (Chief Curator) Monica Shah (Director of Collections & Chief Conservator) and Marion Gajonera ( Education Interpretation Manager).

This series is part of a collaboration sponsored by the Selkregg Foundation, UAA Center for Community Engagement and Learning, and the UAA Writing Department. There is free parking for this event in the Library Lot and the Library NE Lot.

UA is an AA/EO employer and educational institution and prohibits illegal discrimination against any individual: www.alaska.edu/nondiscrimination

How to Contact Legislators

How to contact Legislators:

Public Opinion Messaging
https://www.akleg.gov/poms/

From this website you can select specific committees.

Select Finance and Education Standing Committees and University Subcommittees
Or Select specific legislators who serve on these committees

Or send emails from the Senate or House website.

Senate Finance
http://www.akleg.gov/basis/Committee/Details/31?code=SFIN

Senate Finance UA subcommittee
http://www.akleg.gov/basis/Committee/Details/31?code=SUA%20

House Finance
http://www.akleg.gov/basis/Committee/Details/31?code=HFIN

House Finance UA subcommittee
http://www.akleg.gov/basis/Committee/Details/31?code=HUA%20

Information to Contact the Governor or Legislature

Who to contact via email:

Governor’s Office
http://aws.state.ak.us/CrmForms/Home/Feedback

Public Opinion Messaging
https://www.akleg.gov/poms/

From this website you can select specific committees.

Select Finance and Education Standing Committees and University Subcommittees
Or Select specific legislators who select on these committees

Or send emails from the Senate or House website.

Senate Finance
http://www.akleg.gov/basis/Committee/Details/31?code=SFIN

Senate Finance UA subcommittee
http://www.akleg.gov/basis/Committee/Details/31?code=SUA%20

House Finance
http://www.akleg.gov/basis/Committee/Details/31?code=HFIN

House Finance UA subcommittee
http://www.akleg.gov/basis/Committee/Details/31?code=HUA%20

Or Write to Legislators at:

State Capitol

Juneau AK, 99801 

African American Oral Histories Available

Thanks to the Rasmuson Foundation, UAA and APU have access during 2019 to the HistoryMakers website and to their collection of oral histories of African Americans. The grant program will also increase the number of oral histories for African Americans living in Alaska. There are currently 275 Alaska stories on the website.

Check out the website at: https://alaska.thehistorymakers.org/home

NWCCU Reaffirms UAA’s Institutional Accreditation. Message from Chancellor Sandeen

Dear UAA Community,
I am extremely pleased to inform you that the Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) has reaffirmed UAA’s institutional accreditation. My most heartfelt congratulations to everyone across all of our campuses on this signature accomplishment!

Many of you have been involved in this effort for months, even years, and I am appreciative of your excellent work. I have never before served at an institution that has so fully engaged the institutional accreditation process, across all campuses and including faculty, staff, students and community members. This is your moment!

What is institutional accreditation, and why is it important?
Institutional accreditation is an exhaustive review of every facet of our university. This is a positive milestone that is a testament to the contributions and quality of our students, faculty and staff.

Institutional accreditation qualifies UAA to participate in federal financial aid, and it means that UAA degrees and certificates are recognized by other institutions for things such as the transfer of credits and entrance into graduate study. Visit the Self-Study website to learn more.

What does this mean?
Our reaffirmation establishes UAA has met rigorous standards of quality, effectiveness and sustainability while meeting its mission to serve the needs of the State of Alaska. NWCCU reviewed mission and expectations; resources and capacity; planning and implementation; effectiveness and improvement; and mission fulfillment, adaptation and sustainability.

Through the analysis of accomplishments across our core themes of Teaching and Learning; Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity; Student Success; UAA Community; and Public Square, you demonstrated who we are as an institution.

“A common theme throughout the Seven Year Site Visit was a comprehensive commitment to the institution’s mission, particularly in relationship to access, student success, and supporting communities.”
– NWCCU Evaluation Team

Commendations
You will be proud that UAA received four commendations, each of which acknowledges a key area of accomplishment and reflects UAA’s values. UAA was commended for:

An inclusive planning process for UAA 2020, which brought the campuses together in an unprecedented joint effort focused on Student Success.
Its culture of diversity and inclusivity, especially in relationship to Alaska Native communities.
Its commitment to community engagement and the Public Square.
Its extensive assessment efforts related to student learning. Faculty exhibit robust ownership and leadership in assessing academic programs, and also engage proactively in the multifaceted assessment of general education.
Continuous improvement
NWCCU also noted two areas where UAA is in substantial compliance, but in need of improvement. These are institutional planning of graduate programs and a continued focus on collaborative Student Success efforts. These recommendations did not come as a surprise, as they are high priority areas that the institution is already working on and will continue to address.

I am honored and pleased the commission recognized the amazing work of our faculty, staff and students, who were integral to the entire process. I am committed to working with you to use the results of this process to move the university forward to serve Alaska and its diverse communities.

Congratulations UAA!

Chancellor Sandeen

Earthquake Damage in the Consortium Library

Library Update as of Sunday December 2

The Consortium Library will be closed today, Monday and Tuesday.

The goods news is that there were no reported injuries in the Library during the earthquake on Friday.

While there was no major structural damage to the building and its exterior, there was damage inside. Water from a broken pipe in the 4th floor mechanical area leaked into the collection areas in Archives and AMIPA on the third floor. Work is already underway to stabilize the damage and AMIPA currently has equipment and materials drying in Library 307. There were three locations where glycol leaked from the heating systems and on to the floor. The worst leak was near the food vending machines at the north entrance. In numerous locations the suspended ceiling has partially fallen and there is the danger of further collapse in these areas. A large ceiling light fell to the floor in Library 302a, objects flew around in the office spaces, and pictures and signs were damaged.

By far, the biggest impact is on the library’s collections where at least 100,000 volumes fell to the floor. Again the good news is that the shelving performed as it was designed with no buckling or toppling.

The next steps before opening the library are to stabilize or repair the ceiling areas and to start the huge job of reshelving more than 100,000 volumes. We are restricted to small groups reshelving materials given the repair work that is needed around the building in the ceilings.