North Entrance Open!


The Consortium Library’s north entrance recently opened, so you can now enter the Library from either side of the building.  Stop by and check out our new circulation desk, multi-media room, and IT computer lab on the first floor!  The indoor campus walkway now extends from Rasmuson Hall to the north side of the Library, shortening the outdoor walk between the Library and the Administration and Integrated Science Buildings.



In October 2015, Consortium Library Dean Stephen Rollins wrote this about the upcoming project:

The North Entrance project is long overdue.  When the original 1973 library building was expanded in 2004, the new addition was designed to accommodate a second entrance on the north side of the building.  The plan was to add an arctic entryway once the demand justified its construction.  Based on frequent user comments and complaints and on user surveys, the demand for the north entrance has been steadily increasing over the years. The demand has increased as the campus expanded on the north side of the library building with the construction of the Conoco-Phillips Integrated Science Building, the parking garage, and the relocation of several humanities departments into the Administration Building.  The regular use of the Library for numerous public events every week has also increased the demand as more visitors come to campus and expect access to the building from the north side.  In fact the lack of a north entrance has been the number one complaint about the Library in recent years.

Using FY14 capital funding, the North Entrance project is more than just a second door for the building.  The project will greatly improve handicap access to the Library with parking spaces located just outside of the north entrance. The project also includes a second circulation service desk and a book security system.  With the second circulation desk, the multi-media collection will be moved near the north entrance improving service to this collection. By moving the multi-media collection, the student computer lab on the second floor will be moved to a preferred location on the first floor conveniently adjacent to the library’s reference desk.  Library users will benefit by having immediate access to both reference librarians and IT support.

It is expected that at least 5,000 visitors will use the north entrance weekly during the fall and spring semesters.  When the project is completed, there will be a second library circulation desk and better access to the building, the library collections, and the student computer lab.

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Think Tank on Nov. 3: What can our education system do to serve the needs of Alaska Native students?

Think Tank on Nov. 3: What can our education system do to serve the needs of Alaska Native students?

Thursday, Nov. 3, 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
UAA/APU Consortium Library, Room 307

Topic: What can our education system do to serve the needs of Alaska Native students?

Think Tanks are a monthly community engagement experience in which a nonprofit agency presents a challenge or issue and attendees brainstorm solutions for the organization. Students, faculty, staff and community members–join us to assist this organization and contribute your thoughts and ideas to the discussion!

Pizza is provided by Moose’s Tooth.

Parking note: Free parking for this event is available in the Library Lot only. Please allow extra time to find parking.

This Think Tank is co-hosted by the College of Education and the Center for Community Engagement & Learning.

Institutional self-study: Public square open forum scheduled for Oct. 28

Institutional self-study: Public square open forum scheduled for Oct.

What makes UAA unique? What do you value most about the learning that occurs at UAA? What is distinctive about a UAA graduate? Discuss these questions and more as UAA engages in an institutional self-study. As part of the process, the Office of Academic Affairs will host open forums throughout the academic year addressing UAA’s core themes.

All open forums will take place in UAA/APU Consortium Library, Room 307, and will be available by distance to the community campuses. Follow the links below to register for individual sessions.

Questions? Please contact Academic Affairs at

UAA Community (Core Theme 4)
Friday, Oct. 28, 9–11 a.m.

Research, Scholarship, & Creative Activity (Core Theme 2)
Friday, Nov. 4, 9–11 a.m.

Bringing It All Together: Summary of All Core Theme Sessions
Friday, Dec. 2, 9–11 a.m.

Core Theme Discussion of Findings
Friday, Feb. 24, 9–11 a.m.

The Nobel Prize goes to…

This is the time of year that the Nobel Prizes are handed out to individuals that have made important contributions within Medicine (or Physiology,) Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace and Economics. On Thursday, October 13th, the recipient for the Nobel Prize in Literature will be announced. The Nobel Prize originates from Alfred Nobel, a Swedish businessman, inventor, engineer and chemist, who in 1895 decided to leave the bulk of his fortune in trust to establish a set of prizes. The prize in Economics was established in 1968 by the Swedish Central Bank (Sveriges Riksbank) in memory of Alfred Nobel. To find out more about the Nobel Prize, please take a closer look at the Nobel website. You can find out about the history of the prize and learn about current and past recipients at

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Textbooks and the UAA/APU Consortium Library

Fall semester is almost upon us and if you are looking to acquire textbooks for your classes, remember that the library does not purchase textbooks. Luckily, there are some alternatives for you to consider:

1) Stop by the circulation desk to see if the book has been put on reserve by your professor for your class. Make sure you provide the people at the desk the instructor last name and the title of the item. Or you can check yourself by going to Course Reserves and looking for the course by instructor name, course ID or title.

2) Rent the textbook through the UAA Campus Bookstore or purchase a used copy.

For additional options: check out our Textbook guide .

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SAGE Research Methods has a new look

srmoSAGE Research Methods has relaunched on a new and improved platform. Some of the key features of the new site are:

  • A unified platform for text and video content, providing users with a multimedia research experience
  • A fully responsive site that will work well with all mobile phones and tablet devices
  • Improved discoverability of content, both from within the platform and from external sources
  • The Methods Map has been improved, allowing users to explore method concepts with greater ease. The browse options have been enhanced to align with user needs – allowing browse by discipline, content type, and method topic.






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Keeping up on professional reading: the Use Statistics edition!

Our crew’s professional reading today was the proposed user metrics document created by a SAA and ACRL/RBMS* joint task force. Sound boring? It’s not at all! And it’s incredibly important work because in the end, pretty much everything archives do … Continue reading

Get the scoop! Celebrate National Ice Cream Month …

… by checking out one of the many books on ice cream from the Consortium Library or its partner libraries.  Learn about the history of ice cream, find recipes for making your own, or read some fiction books where ice cream is featured prominently in the plot!

And if dairy isn’t an option for you, here is a list of titles about making all sorts of frozen treats for these hot summer days.

Stay cool, and enjoy!

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