Recently Added Books and eBooks

What’s new?  Well, at least what’s new in Reference, the Social Sciences, Music, and History, which are my primary areas for selection.  Since many of these titles (particularly the ebooks!) don’t make an initial stop on our New Books display near the Main Circulation Desk, it’s always nice to see a representative sampling of what’s currently available.

It’s arranged in rough call number order after the first several titles: the books are easy to arrange, but since ebooks don’t come with call numbers, I’ve arranged them by best guess.  I’ve added an occasional annotation as well.

(While I give call numbers for the books and you can usually use QuickSearch on our home page to find the ebooks these days, often the best way to find ebooks is to click on the ‘Ebooks’ link beneath the QuickSearch box and copy the title into the second search box.)

These first two titles sound a little like treatises on Druidic mysticism, but they actually feature a great variety of highly visual examples of how knowledge has been depicted through history up to the present, each organized by the primary style of presentation used: circle or tree formats.  Lima’s books have been compared with Edward Tufte’s works on information presentation; both titles make for inspirational and delightful browsing:
eBook
The Book of Circles: Visualizing Spheres of Knowledge – Lima, Manuel

eBook
The Book of Trees: Visualizing Branches of Knowledge – Lima, Manuel

eBook
How To Write a Successful Research Grant Application: A Guide For Social And Behavioral Scientists, 2nd Ed.

BF76.4.T45 2018
A Telepsychology Casebook: Using Technology Ethically and Effectively In Your Professional Practice – Campbell, Millan, And Martin

BF575.P9 C33 2017
The Cambridge Handbook of The Psychology of Prejudice – Chris G. Sibley And Fiona Kate Barlow, Eds.

eBook
What Psychology Majors Could and Should Be Doing: A Guide to Research Experience, Professional Skills, and Your Options After College, 2nd Ed.

eBook
Social Issues in Living Color:  Challenges and Solutions from the Perspective of Ethnic Minority Psychology – Arthur Blume, Ed.

eBook
The Anti-Anxiety Workbook: Proven Strategies to Overcome Worry, Phobias, Panic, and Obsessions – Antony and Norton

eBook
War and Religion: An Encyclopedia of Faith and Conflict – Jeffrey M. Shaw And Timothy J. Demy, Eds.

eBook
Food, Feasts, and Faith: An Encyclopedia of Food Culture in World Religions – Paul Fieldhouse

D523.J44 2016
1916: A Global History – Jeffery, Keith

DK254.R3 S66 2016
Rasputin: Faith, Power, and the Twilight of the Romanovs – Douglas Smith

DS735.C3145 V.9 Pt.2
Cambridge History of China:  Vol. 9 Part 2 The Ch’ing Dynasty To 1800 – Willard Peterson

DK265.S525 2015
The “Russian” Civil Wars, 1916-1926: Ten Years that Shook the World – Smele, Jonathan

The Ryukyu Kingdom was centered on Okinawa:
DS895.R95 A3713 2017
The Ryukyu Kingdom: Cornerstone of East Asia – Mamoru Akamine

DS902.17.K67 2014
History Of Korea In Maps: From Prehistory to the Twenty-First Century – Michael D. Shin

The following title is an excellent book on the Charleston slave rebellion of 1822:
eBook
The Denmark Vesey Affair: A Documentary History – Ed. By Douglas R. Egerton And Robert L. Paquette

E98.M34 C65 2017
Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits:  Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture – Chip Colwell

HB195.C28 2016
How States Pay for Wars – Cappella Zielinski, Rosella

HM585.R65 2017
Theory for the Working Sociologist – Rojas, Fabio

eBook
Culture in Networks – Mclean, Paul

HM742.K53 2017
Social Media Freaks: Digital Identity in the Network Society – Kidd, Dustin

HQ144.G779 2016
Trafficked Children and Youth in The United States: Reimagining Survivors – Goździak, Elżbieta M.

eBook
Immigration: Examining the Facts – Eastman, Cari Lee Skogberg

eBook
Talking Conflict: The Loaded Language of Genocide, Political Violence, Terrorism, and Warfare – Anna M. Wittmann

eBook
Women, War, and Violence: Topography, Resistance, and Hope – Mariam M. Kurtz and Lester R. Kurtz, Eds.

eBook
Windows into the Soul: Surveillance and Society in an Age of High Technology – Marx, Gary T.

eBook
Dangerous Spaces: Beyond the Racial Profile – Jones, D. Marvin

eBook
Mindfulness for the Next Generation: Helping Emerging Adults Manage Stress and Lead Healthier Lives – Holly Rogers

eBook
Cross-National Public Opinion about Homosexuality: Examining Attitudes Across the Globe – Adamczyk, Amy

eBook
Social Work and the City: Urban Themes in 21st-Century Social Work – Charlotte Williams, Ed.

eBook
The Disability Studies Reader, 5th Ed. – Lennard J. Davis, Ed.

HV9304.L54 2016
After Life Imprisonment: Reentry in the Era of Mass Incarceration – Liem, Marieke

eBook
Josquin des Prez and His Musical Legacy: An Introductory Guide – William Elders

eBook
Composer Genealogies: A Compendium of Composers, Their Teachers, and Their Students – Pfitzinger, Scott

ML410.E44 C34 2014
Cambridge Companion to Duke Ellington – Edward Green

eBook
Vaccination and Its Critics: A Documentary and Reference Guide – Rosner, Lisa

eBook
Oxford Companion to Cheese – Catherine Donnelly

eBook
Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing – Kirschenbaum, Matthew G.

This next title is by our own Paul White of Anthropology:
TN23.W55 2017
The Archaeology of American Mining – Paul White

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Get help with end-of-semester research projects

Are you working on end-of-semester assignments? If you’re having trouble finding sources or you’re trying to figure out whether a source is credible, contact the Reference Desk. Reference Desk Librarians can help you with every stage of the research process, from figuring out what to put in a search box to citing sources. When you’ve tried searching on your own without success for 10 or 15 minutes, talking with a librarian will save you time and frustration.

Call: (907) 786-1848

Email: http://ask.consortiumlibrary.org/ask

Live Chat: http://ask.consortiumlibrary.org/

Reference Desk First Floor Hours: https://consortiumlibrary.org/about/hours/research.php

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Get Ready for the Great American Smokeout on Nov 16!

This year, the Great American Smokeout will be on November 16, 2017, when smokers across the country take part in the American Cancer Society’s annual event. The Smokeout began nationwide in 1977, so this year will be the 40th anniversary.

Take a look at these resources from the Library Catalog that encourage people to stop smoking and take an important step toward a healthier life.

 

 

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Did you miss it?

We had an Open House on Wednesday afternoon to celebrate Archives Month and because we love just hanging out with our researchers, donors, colleagues, supporters: they’re friends! And we’re very thankful for them.  We’re also thankful for Northwest Archivists, …

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He Said, She Said, Who Said?

Occasionally, someone asks us at the Reference Desk to verify a quotation.  It may be a commonly known phrase, something a famous person said, a proverb from another land, or something pretty (okay, terribly!) obscure.  What to do?  Google, right!  But hold onto your Googs; if you try Google, you’ll often find that the exact same quote – whether correct or not – ping-pongs and pinballs and pachinkos its way from blog to website to Facebook to Pinterest and back to blog ad infinitum with no authoritative source to ground it until nobody really knows whether the quote is accurate, where it originally came from, or whether it’s coming or going.  Of course, that might not matter if you share the philosophy of the Bandar-Log Monkeys in the chapter on Kaa’s Hunting in the first book of Kipling’s The Jungle Book:

We all say so, and so it must be true….

But we rely on accuracy rather than popularity here, and having to plow through an endless number of parroting web pages just makes it all the harder to verify the authentic text and its original source.  That’s why we have what you might call the Un-Google:  a good half dozen or so shelves of quotation books and related dictionaries and sources in the Reference Collection in the P6000’s.  It requires patience, sure, and it’s far from perfect — finding an accurate quote with a confirmed provenance can be a very lengthy and difficult affair, especially when the quotation is inaccurately or only partially remembered — but at least when you find one, the source is usually given.

There are general quotation compilations, such as Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, as well as ones on very specific subjects. (Throwing Monkeys at the Coconuts, for instance, is a collection of travel quotations, although that’s one we don’t have.)  And the indexing of quotes inside the book will vary: some will be indexed by author, some by date or theme, some by the first line of the quote, and others might be by language or country.  Here are a few examples from several quotation books and specialized dictionaries in this part of the Reference Collection:

REF PN6080 .C57 2001
The Concise Dictionary of Foreign Quotations  (p. 113)
Si nous n’avions point de défauts, nous ne prendrions pas tant de plaisir à en remarquer dans les autres.
(If we had no failings, we would not be so pleased to notice them in others.)
(La Rochefoucauld:  Reflexions)

REF PN 6084 .W6 B47 1996
Women’s Words:  The Columbia Book of Quotations by Women  (p. 251)
… people are almost always better than their neighbours think they are.
(George Eliot, Middlemarch, chapter 72)

REF PN 6231 .W64 B43 2015
Spin-glish:  The Definitive Dictionary of Deliberately Deceptive Language  (pp. 82, 232)
Section 1:  Spin-glish to English definition:
Health care procurement specialist:  Insurance salesperson

Section 2:  English to Spin-glish definition:
Undertaker:  After-death care provider; bereavement care expert; post-health professional.

(This recent spin-quote will unfortunately have to wait for the 2nd edition:
“empowering a culture of controversy prevention.”
https://www.adn.com/opinions/2017/04/23/oh-please-no-controversy-on-campus/ )

REF PN 6371 .D65 1996
I Love Me, Vol. I
Now, this title sounds rather like a multi-volume ode to narcissism, doesn’t it?  Anyone you know?  Can’t wait for Vol. II to come out?  Then try reading it backwards:  it’s a dictionary of palindromes!  Many entries are rather forced – after all, palindromes are difficult! – but some are rather charming (p.231):
Norma is as selfless as I am, Ron

Nor are palindromes restricted to English (p. 219.):
Nisumaa oli isasi ilo aamusin
(Finnish: The field of wheat was your father’s joy in the morning)

Hmm, I think I’ll let you figure out what that one means!  There are full word palindromes, too, not just letter-by-letter ones (p. 139):
Girl, bathing on Bikini, eyeing boy, finds boy eyeing bikini on bathing girl.

And for those who don’t care for Hawaiian music (p. 250):
Oh, no!  Don Ho!

But if someone comes up and tells you this practically cliché palindrome:  “A man, a plan, a canal:  Panama!” you can offer the perfect rejoinder given on p.227:  “No, it’s a banana bastion.”

Sometimes, everyone knows the quotation and who said it – except when that’s not the case.  Like what?  Well, like this popular and insightful quotation from Petronius Arbiter in about 210 B.C.:
We trained hard – but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we were reorganized.  I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing, and what a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while actually producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.

But there’s no note of who translated it into English – or did it even need to be translated?  Did Petronius even write it?  Jim Reeds looked into it and noted that Petronius Arbiter was alive in Nero’s reign over 200 years later – a rather Biblical lifespan!  Beyond that, Reeds couldn’t find any citing of the quotation before 1945 or so (and that’s A.D., mind you, not B.C.!).  But what about the provenance of this revisionist information, much less the quotation itself?  I’ve seen the relevant web page myself, but All Things Must Pass (à la George Harrison’s album title), and so has that web page!  Fortunately, the Wayback Machine (www.waybackmachine.org) can come to the rescue, so here’s a preserved version of the page:
http://web.archive.org/web/20050404005706/http://www.dtc.umn.edu:80/~reedsj/petronius.html
(You can close the banner message that appears at the top.)

There are plenty of variants and translations given in the beginning, so you’ll need to scroll down a bit to get to the source information about the quotation.

A recent book has even been written on the subject of mistaken quotes:
Hemingway Didn’t Say That:  The Truth Behind Familiar Quotations by Garson O’Toole
http://www.npr.org/2017/04/04/522581148/hemingway-didnt-say-that-and-neither-did-twain-or-kafka

Still, not every good quote is collected in a quotation book, so until next time, I’ll leave you with this bit of wisdom from a long ago fortune cookie:

A little madness,
A little kindness
Makes for happiness

 

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This week: Open forums for Interim Vice Provost for Student Success Oct. 4- 5

This week: Open forums for Interim Vice Provost for Student Success

All faculty, staff, students, advisory committee members and members of the UAA community
are invited to attend open forums scheduled to provide candidates the opportunity to introduce
themselves and to present on “What does success look like at UAA in 2020 as a result of their
leadership and what do they see as the top priorities for this position?” A Q&A session will
follow the presentation.

Open forums:

Claudia Lampman, Ph.D.
Director, Department of Psychology
College of Arts and Sciences, UAA
Wednesday, Oct. 4, 3–4 p.m.
UAA/APU Consortium Library, Room 307

Elijah André Thorn, Ph.D.
Director, Multicultural Center
University of Alaska Anchorage
Thursday, October 5, 9–10 a.m.
UAA/APU Consortium Library, Room 307

Daniel Kline, Ph.D.
Director, General Education
College of Arts and Sciences, UAA
Thursday, October 5, 10:15 a.m.–11:15 a.m.
UAA/APU Consortium Library, Room 307

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