Citing Sources

Does the citing part of writing scare you? Do you feel like you are never quite sure when and how to cite your sources in an assignment?

The library is here to help!  Learn how to read a citation and how to properly cite in APA, MLA or Chicago citation styles in our new guide: Citing Sources.

If you need further assistance, please contact a UAA/APU Consortium Librarian.

Posted in Uncategorized

New in the Archives: March 2018

March has been a busy month for us! Must be all that extra light we’re getting right now that’s letting us get all this work done!

Collections described:

Ruth Hart papers; 1964-2003. HMC-1279. The collection contains the papers of Ruth …

The post New in the Archives: March 2018 appeared first on Archives and Special Collections.

Trurl and Klapaucius

Artificial Intelligence: it’s all over the place. Deep Blue beats Kasparov at chess, AlphaGo teaches itself to win at Go through an artificial neural network, a chatbot named Microsoft Little Ice has written Chinese poems published as Sunshine Misses Windows, and self-driving cars are driving—well, at least as well as some of us do!

AI has been around even longer in fiction, films, and other entertainments that feature computers, robots, and androids in various flavors of menace and delight:  R.U.R. (Rossum’s Universal Robots), HAL 9000, Star Trek, Gort, Neuromancer, the Alien films, Deus ex Machina, R2D2 and C3PO, Bladerunner (née Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Magnus-Robot Fighter, Morning Becomes Electric, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, The Matrix trilogy—and does anyone remember Colossus: The Forbin Project?  Along with so many others.  If only they were all well-behaved enough to obey Isaac Asimov’s famous Three Laws given in I, Robot…but then, where would all our stories be if everything worked smoothly?

And about that AI-composed poetry.  Stanislaw Lem, the Polish science fiction master, is probably best known for his novel Solaris, which was made famous by the Tarkovsky film.  But he wrote many other works as well, one of them being a series of tales from the mid-1960s about two constructor robots named Trurl and Klapaucius, collected as The Cyberiad: Fables for the Cybernetic Age.  If for that special occasion, you’ve been looking for a unique love poem that’s ”…lyrical, pastoral, and expressed in the language of pure mathematics.  Tensor algebra mainly, with a little topology and higher calculus, if need be.  But with feeling, you understand, and in the cybernetic spirit….” then look no farther: you’ll find it among The Seven Sallies of Trurl and Kalpaucius in The First Sally (A), or Trurl’s Electronic Bard.  Frankly, it puts Microsoft Little Ice to shame.

While you can find information about Deep Blue, AlphaGo, Microsoft Little Ice, and plenty of other artificial intelligence accomplishments regularly flooding your electronic doorstep these days whether you want it there or not, you sometimes have to dig a little deeper for things like the sallies of Trurl and Klapaucius, all of which are worth reading and thinking about.  But you can find them if you go to the Library Catalog and type in Cyberiad — it will come up as an Alaska’s Digital Library ebook that you can check out. (Sorry – QuickSearch will bring up interesting articles about The Cyberiad, but not the Alaska’s Digital Library copy.)  Oh, and by the way—good luck with that tensor algebra!

Posted in Uncategorized

Textbook Affordability Week Events – March 26 -30

UAA is hosting it’s first annual Textbook Affordability Week (TAW).  The week of March 26 – 30 there will be events all week designed to increase awareness, provide information, and promote dialogue around reducing the costs of textbooks and course material to support student success.  There is a TAW website to highlight these events.

Posted in Uncategorized

Scenes from the Archives: So many questions and no answers

Occasionally when we are filling reference requests or describing photographs for Alaska’s Digital Archives or describing new collections, we come across photographs, documents, and audio recordings that lead to more questions than answers. Like what are those two little boys …

The post Scenes from the Archives: So many questions and no answers appeared first on Archives and Special Collections.

Posted in Uncategorized

Access to Information as a Human Right

Access to Information is a part of the Universal Human Rights Declaration. You can learn more on the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) website, where they state that “Freedom of Information (FOI) can be defined as the right to access information held by public bodies. It is an integral part of the fundamental right of freedom of expression, as recognized by Resolution 59 of the UN General Assembly adopted in 1946, as well as by Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), which states that the fundamental right of freedom of expression encompasses the freedom to “to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers”

Posted in Uncategorized

Are You Ready To Binge Watch?

The library’s Academic Video Online: Premium collection delivers nearly 70,000 streaming videos (films, documentaries, newsreels, performances, interviews, lectures, television). Choose titles from special collections of American History & World History; Art & Architecture; Asian Film; Counseling & Therapy; Dance; Filmakers Library; Silent Film; and more.

Whether you’re studying or relaxing, you can find content covering Anthropology, Art & Design, Business, Criminal Justice, Diversity Studies, Education, Gender & Sexuality, Health Sciences, History, Literature & Language, Music & Performing Arts, Psychology & Counseling, Science & Engineering, and Social Sciences.

The database includes 60 Minutes/CBS and specials from PBS, BBC, NBC, A&E, and hundreds of other producers and distributers. New content is added monthly. Some examples of titles/series are: Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock; Mali Blues; 10 Days that Unexpectedly Changed America; Advertising in the Digital Age; ZouZou; 50 Mindfulness Techniques; Water Wars; 60 Second Adventures in Astronomy; and La Chanson de Roland.

You can make clips, create playlists, and post to Blackboard using Adobe Flash Player.

Posted in Uncategorized